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In this dark house

In this dark house

建筑大师贝特洛.莱伯金的一生

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所属分类
Architecture  > General
出版社
Penguin
ISBN-13
9780140253375
ISBN-10
0140253378
出版日期
1997-03
页数
240
单位
尺寸
* *
装帧
Paperback
版本

Product Description

The author of this memoir is the youngest daughter of Berthold Lubetkin, an architect who came to prominence in Britain in the 1930s as one of the first modernists. He abruptly dropped out of London society just before the war and moved with his wife to the tiny village of Upper Killington in the Severn Valley where he raised a family in a house they named "World's End". There, he kept his family in utter isolation, in their own world where his word was law. A tryant and a bully, he dominated his wife and family absolutely and it was not until after his death that his daughter came to know the precise nature of the devils which drove him on. Lubetkin's family had died at Auschwitz, unacknowledged by a son who had never tried to save them and who had never forgiven himself.

About the Author

LOUISE KEHOE is a writer and garden designer who lives in New Hampshire. In This Dark House won the National Jewish Book Award in 1995 and, in the United Kingdom, the Jewish Quarterly–Wingate Prize in 1997.


From the Trade Paperback edition. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review


?A marvelously lucid account of a savage childhood, and of the family conspiracy that engendered it.?
?Anita Brookner

?Well constructed and beautifully written, [with] an emotional honesty which generates its own kind of lasting truth.?
?The Times Literary Supplement


From the Trade Paperback edition. -- Review --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

In 1939 the influential architect Berthold Lubetkin abruptly left his thriving career in London and dropped out of sight, moving with his wife to a desolate farm in rural Gloucestershire. Life in the house the Lubetkins named ?World?s End? was far from idyllic for their three children. Louise Kehoe and her siblings lived in an atmosphere of oppressive isolation, while their tyrannical father?at times charming and witty but usually a terrorist in a
self-styled Stalinist hell?badgered and belittled them during his fits of self-loathing. Even his true identity remained an enigma. That secret was never divulged during her father?s lifetime, but Louise?s quest to unearth its tragic origins?her relentless piecing together of the clues she found after his death?is a remarkable story, written with extraordinary grace, style, and imagination, of an identity and a heritage lost and found.


From the Trade Paperback edition. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover


“A marvelously lucid account of a savage childhood, and of the family conspiracy that engendered it.”
—Anita Brookner

“Well constructed and beautifully written, [with] an emotional honesty which generates its own kind of lasting truth.”
The Times Literary Supplement --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly

In 1940, Kehoe's father, Berthold Lubetkin, a renowned Russian-born architect, abruptly abandoned his London career and retreated with his wife and three children to a remote farm in southwestern England called World's End. In this riveting memoir, Kehoe, a journalist in Massachusetts, describes the nightmare world she, her older sister and her younger brother inhabited as children. Cut off from the rest of the world, they were at the mercy of an abusive and tyrannical father who forbade them to come into contact with other children and mercilessly undermined any abilities they possessed or opinions they expressed. Although Kehoe's mother loved her children, she adored her husband and appeased him at their expense. A militant communist and atheist, Lubetkin forced his views on his family, which further alienated Kehoe from her schoolmates. After his death she discovered that her father had concealed his Jewish ancestry from everyone but his wife (who was a Christian) and was haunted by the deaths of his parents during the Holocaust. Kehoe is now a practicing Jew. An extraordinary, well-told story of a brutal childhood.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

What do you make of a man who abandons a promising career in London to hole up in a remote country home he calls World's End? That's the course of action Kehoe's mysterious, irascible, diabolically charming, and tyrannical father, the celebrated architect Berthold Lubetkin, chose in 1939. And that's not all. He also, with the anguished complicity of his bright, competent, yet self-sacrificing wife, concealed the painful truth about his past, even lying to his own children. The burden of this mad secrecy weighed heavily on Lubetkin who took out all his guilt, sorrow, and rage on his family, virtually holding them hostage to his obsessions. It was only after his death that Kehoe, who suffered mightily not only from her father's extreme yet seductive cruelty, but also from her mother's blind loyalty to her husband, discovered the tragic truth about her heritage. Kehoe's heartbreaking story is astonishing enough on its own, but her riveting, luminous prose style transforms it into a triumphantly beautiful and moving work of art. We won't soon forget Kehoe's courage or her eloquence. Donna Seaman --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal

Eloquently written and a pleasure to read, this profile of a dysfunctional family offers more than the typical sturm und drang. Instead of simply plumbing her scarred psyche, the author seeks to understand why her sophisticated architect-turned-farmer father wielded tyrannical control over his family. Kehoe opens by describing her childhood in idyllic rural England, where her world-class architect father abruptly had relocated his family at the outbreak of World War II. The unfolding narrative reads like a mystery, with appropriately surprising results. The father's concealment of his Jewish ancestry and abandonment of his own parents to be murdered by the Nazis were secrets not discovered until after his death, secrets that have transformed Kehoe's life. Recommended for larger popular biography collections.?A. Arro Smith, San Marcos P.L., Tex.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.